Panacea Charitable Trust grants £15,000 to Beds & Northants MS Therapy Centre

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MS Therapy Centre
MS nurse, Emma, leading a ‘Digesting Science’ workshop, where children can learn about MS and how it affects a family member

The Panacea Charitable Trust has awarded the Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire MS Therapy Centre a grant towards the provision of nursing services of £15,000.

The Panacea Charitable Trust’s grants fund supports a broad range of initiatives and recipients in Bedfordshire, providing a range of valuable work and support in the area.

Based at Bradbury House in Bedford, the MS Therapy Centre was set up in 1983 to aid those with Multiple Sclerosis.

All therapies are provided free at the point of use to the MS Therapy Centre’s 1,000 members, with donations requested towards running costs. The charity receives no statutory funding and needs to raise £400,000 every year to keep the Centre open.



Kay Taylor, Chair of Trustees said, “We are so grateful to the Panacea Charitable Trust for this financial boost.

“Donations of this nature ensure we can continue to provide the services that make such a difference to the lives of people attending the MS Therapy Centre.”

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurological condition that affects around 107,000 people across the UK. Affecting the central nervous system, made up of the brain and spinal cord, there is currently no cure.

The symptoms experienced vary greatly from person to person and over time. Such symptoms may include a range of mobility difficulties, fatigue, pain, sensory problems vision, cognition difficulties and issues with bodily functions such as speech, swallowing, bladder and bowel function.

With no specialist MS nurse provision at Bedford Hospital, people with MS find themselves struggling on their own to manage this long-term condition.

The funding will support MS specialist nurses who can carry out regular assessments, give advice on medication, liaise with other members of the multi-disciplinary team at the MS Therapy Centre and refer into appropriate NHS services.

Early intervention and management of symptoms in this way may result in fewer hospital admissions, improved wellbeing and better quality of life.

“The nurses have probably kept me out of hospital a few times,” said Tanya, a regular MS Therapy Centre user.

“They understand that everyone’s MS is different and everybody with MS is individual…. They come up with amazing solutions that help you manage on your own.”

Miranda Olding, Clinical Nurse Specialist in MS at the Beds and Northants MS Therapy Centre says, “The help that we give people with MS may include education and health promotion, help with managing acute relapses, navigating work, treatments, dealing with both visible and invisible symptoms, and managing life with a complex disability.

“We are lucky enough to provide this care in a multi-disciplinary environment with access to exercise, physio and holistic therapies, and we also liaise with and work together with our colleagues in the NHS to provide the best care possible.

“This helps people with MS to continue to live full and independent lives with the condition.”