Government’s A-level results U turn was welcome, but questions remain

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Mohammad Yasin MP
Mohammad Yasin, MP for Bedford and Kempston Pic credit: Chris McAndrew

After a weekend of growing outrage and pressure from A-level students, teachers and the Labour Party, the inevitability of the Government U turn was clear by Monday lunchtime.

Students, put through agonies thanks to Ofqual’s remarkably unjust algorithm, would indeed be able to use their teacher-assessed grades.

The current pandemic crisis would have understandably put any Government through its paces, but it’s hard to fathom how any could be as unfit for the job than this one.

The latest of Boris Johnson’s inner circle to fail, whilst also failing to take any responsibility for his failure, is the Education Secretary Gavin Williamson.

Whilst I’m relieved that these students’ futures are no longer at the mercy of illogical downgrading, not only was the Government’s U turn once again inevitable despite resolutions to the contrary over the weekend, there are serious ramifications.

The announcement of A-level results sets off a chain reaction of time-sensitive processes and will have consequences even further down the line.

Under Gavin Williamson’s watch Ofqual used an algorithm to standardise A-level results despite statisticians and experts’ warnings of its inherent weaknesses.

Defaulting to the teacher’s assessments was the only other route possible after results day, hence the U turn, as it’s far too late to implement a fairer method of standardisation.

I’m pleased at the U turn for the sake of the students, but will this Government learn from their mistakes and act fast to minimise negative consequences?

Universities filled spaces on courses last week after the results were announced, so those students whose grades were upgraded may now miss out on a place this year. University admissions teams – at what is always an incredibly busy time– are having to pull out all the stops to work through several challenges presented by the Government’s policy change at this late stage of the admissions process, and still require urgent clarification and advice from government.

Universities with lower admissions criteria, already struggling for many reasons due to the pandemic, will face even more pressure if their classes aren’t filled.

Furthermore, the Government have ignored an entire group of students. Over the past week BTEC students have largely been overlooked amongst the furore, with thousands still waiting for their results, again potentially losing out on opportunities for their next steps.

I have been contacted by year 12 students, rightly wondering what all of this is going to mean for their own prospects when it’s time for their results next year.

Students will not return to school in September having experienced equal levels of education since schools first closed their doors in March, and yet the Government wishes to deny this is the reality.

Once again, the door is wide open to inequality – how can a pupil with access to a laptop, decent broadband connection and a full school week’s distance learning from the outset be anything but at an advantage against students whose learning has been patchy at best? – and whilst I would like to think lessons will have been learned, experience shows us this government is not one to reflect on its mistakes, but would rather bat away any suggestion of incompetence and put blame squarely on other organisations.

The Government still has time to protect the current Year 12 students, to ensure that none are put at an avoidable disadvantage – whether that’s in their preparations for exams, or having fewer spaces to compete for at universities whilst students missing out this year, defer their applications to September 2021- and my Labour colleagues and I will keep putting pressure on this government to act timely, and fairly.

Gavin Williamson’s A-level result debacle is depleting teachers and school leadership’s valuable time and energy. Schools deserve every bit of extra support to navigate their way through these uncharted waters, not to be sent off course by sand bars and obstacles that can be seen miles ahead.

Whilst the U turn on A-levels is welcome there are too many questions that remain.

This Government must be held to account and if Gavin Williamson doesn’t resign, he should be sacked.

Members of Boris Johnson’s cabinet need the humility and self-reflection to recognise their many shortcomings, listen to the experts who see what’s coming ahead and work much harder at anticipating problems before they arise, for all our sakes.

This is a monthly guest column provided by
Mohammad Yasin MP and published unedited.

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